Last edited by Fenrigis
Saturday, August 8, 2020 | History

2 edition of Democracy, trade unions and political violence in Spain found in the catalog.

Democracy, trade unions and political violence in Spain

Richard Purkiss

Democracy, trade unions and political violence in Spain

the Valencian anarchist movement, 1918-1936

by Richard Purkiss

  • 193 Want to read
  • 19 Currently reading

Published by Sussex Academic Press in Eastbourne, Portland, Or .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • History,
  • Anarchism,
  • Democracy,
  • Labor movement

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    StatementRichard Purkiss
    SeriesThe Cañada Blanch/Sussex Academic studies on contemporary Spain, Cañada Blanch/Sussex Academic studies on contemporary Spain
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsHX928.V35 P87 2011
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxiv, 304 p. ;
    Number of Pages304
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25059661M
    ISBN 101845194616
    ISBN 109781845194611
    LC Control Number2010051038
    OCLC/WorldCa676727166

    Spain’s First Democracy The Second Republic, – Stanley G. Payne “[Stanley Payne is] America’s most prolific historian of Spain.” —Paul Preston, New York Times Book Review The significance of Spain’s Second Republic has been largely overshadowed by the cataclysmic Civil War that immediately followed it.   Union opposition to apartheid in South Africa broke the back of a racist regime. Trade union opposition to military dictatorship in Brazil and a score of other South and Central American countries formed a vanguard for democratic change. Trade unions stood at the center of mass pro-democracy movements in South Korea and the Philippines in the.

    Webb’s book ‘Industrial democracy’ is the Bible of trade unionism. According to Webb, trade unionism is an extension of democracy from political sphere to industrial sphere. Webb agreed with Marx that trade unionism is a class struggle and modern capitalist state is a transitional phase which will lead to democratic socialism. One of the classic arguments advanced by the Franco regime’s ideologues was the assertion that “we Spaniards are not ready for democracy.” This claim was based on several distinguishing characteristics of Spanish politics of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries: political violence and the manipulation of electoral results; corruption and the absence of a civic conscience.

    Democracy and Political Violence applies democratic theory to the problem of creating a liberal democracy in a situation of conflict, violence, and social division. It adopts a distinct perspective: that both community and conflict are at the heart of all but the smallest of democratic societies, and that they need to be reconciled in order for democracy to be successful. At pm on the 24th January eight lawyers were working late at the offices of Comisiones Obreras (CCOO), one of Spain’s trade unions which was set up by the Spanish Communist Party. At.


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Democracy, trade unions and political violence in Spain by Richard Purkiss Download PDF EPUB FB2

The publication of Richard Purkiss’ monograph Democracy, Trade Unions and Violence in Spain offers us an opportunity to revisit the Valencian anarchists and Vega’s earlier conclusions.

The book’s title is somewhat vague and misleading – it reads like a checklist of attractive key words in recent historiography – and is clearly aimed. Democracy, Trade Unions and Political Violence in Spain: The Valencian Anarchist Movement, –Author: George Esenwein.

Trade Unions and Democracy explores the role of trade unions as products of, and agents for, democracy. As civil society agents, unions may promote democracy within the wider society, especially in the case of authoritarian regimes or other rigid political systems, by acting as watchdogs and protecting hard-won democratic Democracy.

Established democratic institutions in many advanced societies. A list of trade unions in Spain. Unions. Agrarian Trade unions and political violence in Spain book Union Federation; Andalusian Workers Union; Central Sindical Independiente y de Funcionarios (CSIF) Coordinadora Obrera Sindical (COS) Confederación General del Trabajo (CGT) Confederación Nacional del Trabajo (CNT) Confederación Intersindical Galega (CIG)Economy: Agriculture, Banks, Car.

Trade Unions and Democracy explores the role of trade unions as products of, and agents for, democracy. As civil society agents, unions may promote democracy within the wider society, especially in the case of authoritarian regimes or other rigid political systems, by acting as watchdogs and protecting hard-won democratic ished democratic institutions in many Cited by: In this book, top scholars look at the efficacy of trade union and worker protest in overthrowing authoritarian governments in Africa.

The analytical introduction and case studies from major African countries argue that unions were often the most important single social force in. Available for the first time in paperback, this book explores the role of trade unions as products of, and agents for, democracy.

The crisis facing established democratic institutions in the advanced societies has been widely noted. Political role of Juan Carlos I. General Francisco Franco came to power infollowing the Spanish Civil War (–), and ruled as a dictator until his death in Inhe designated Prince Juan Carlos, grandson of Spain's most recent king, Alfonso XIII, as his official the next six years, Prince Juan Carlos initially remained in the background during public.

The conflict between them accounts for much of Spain’s political turbulence, both historically and throughout much of the twentieth century. It was the backdrop to the country’s civil war, in which traditional, Catholic and quasi-fascist forces rebelled against and.

From Unorganized Street Protests to Organizing Unions. International Relations, Labour • August 7, • Anita Chan. The Birth of a New Trade Union Movement in Hong Kong. For several months inthe world’s news media was front-paging the Hong Kong anti-extradition bill movement almost on a daily basis.

Industrial democracy is an arrangement which involves workers making decisions, sharing responsibility and authority in the workplace. While in participative management organizational designs workers are listened to and take part in the decision-making process, in organizations employing industrial democracy they also have the final decisive power (they decide about organizational design and.

While Spain is now a well-established democracy closely integrated into the European Union, it has suffered from a number of severe internal problems such as corruption, discord between state and regional nationalism, and separatist terrorism.

The Politics of Contemporary Spain charts the trajectory of Spanish politics from the transition to democracy through to the present day, including the.

The link between trade unions and democracy has been of paramount importance since the emergence of the ‘labour problem’, as reflected by the concept of ‘Industrial Democracy’ (Webb and Webb, ).This concept systematically linked the workplace to the broader political context in which it.

Political changes in Spain during the second half of the nineteenth century led to the development of Catholic Integrism and Carlism struggling against a separation of church and state.

The clearest expression of this struggle arose around the publication of the book Liberalism is a Sin. The state and democracy in Spain however, we will briefly examine Spain’s political history, beginning with the very founding of the Spanish state.

This historical overview is particularly important insofar as it will enable us to understand the origins of several divisive cleavages that have contributed to conflict and political instability. But Tunisia’s democracy remains fragile, threatened by political violence, a crackdown on dissidents, and human rights violations.

In Cuba, too, there are finally hopes for a democratic future, as aging authoritarian rulers begin to introduce reforms. Democracy and violence, in India and beyond. Historian Ramachandra Guha analyses the causes and conditions of the violent struggles of Kashmiris in India and Tamils in Sri Lanka, and draws an alternative path between independence and assimilation that recognises and preserves the essential elements of democracy for all sides.

This chapter focuses on 'liberal democracy', and examines the idea of democracy as 'the sovereign people' governed by consent.

It explores arguments for and against democracy, and some reflections on the future of democracy in the twenty-first century. The chapter identifies a number of features of democracy. These features include democracy as a system of government, democracy. Ortuño Anaya establishes for the first time the role played by European socialist and trade union organizations, in particular the German Social Democratic Party and its affiliated unions, the Labor movements in the UK, and the French Socialists.

Maravall and J. Santamaría, ‘Political Change in Spain and the Prospects for Democracy’, in Guillermo O'Donnell and Philippe C. Schmitter (eds), Transitions from Authoritarian Rule: Tentative Conclusions about Uncertain Democracies (Baltimore: The. Tracing the progressive collapse of the Republican polity in the first half ofPayne stresses the importance of political violence in the democracy’s downfall.

In restoring perspectives that have been ignored or bypassed, Payne presents a consistent and detailed interpretation of Spain’s Second Republic, demonstrating its striking.Patricio Aylwin, a leader of the opposition to General Augusto Pinochet, Chile's long-ruling dictator, became his country's first elected president after the restoration of democracy in Tadeusz Mazowiecki, a Catholic intellectual and a leader of the trade union Solidarity, became the first prime minister of postcommunist Poland.On the other hand, the macro successes of Spain's democracy present an overly simplified depiction and prevent a more nuanced characterization of the trade-offs, strengths, and weaknesses of Spanish democracy, which are equally important for comparative politics research.

This book partially fills these gaps by analyzing Spanish political.